No relief from leaves

No treehuggers here: The London plane trees are annoying neighbours, according to Adel Kamel, Naya Sione, Janette Butros, Abraham Abadeer, Gary Visser and Anwar Mikhail and (inset) the offending leaves. Pictures: Gary Warrick

No treehuggers here: The London plane trees are annoying neighbours, according to Adel Kamel, Naya Sione, Janette Butros, Abraham Abadeer, Gary Visser and Anwar Mikhail and (inset) the offending leaves. Pictures: Gary Warrick

No treehuggers here: The London plane trees are annoying neighbours, according to Adel Kamel, Naya Sione, Janette Butros, Abraham Abadeer, Gary Visser and Anwar Mikhail and (inset) the offending leaves. Pictures: Gary Warrick

No treehuggers here: The London plane trees are annoying neighbours, according to Adel Kamel, Naya Sione, Janette Butros, Abraham Abadeer, Gary Visser and Anwar Mikhail and (inset) the offending leaves. Pictures: Gary Warrick

Are these residents up their tree? With World Environment Day two days away, they want the London plane trees in their street to be cut down, but Penrith Council says there is nothing wrong with the trees

These London plane trees must go, St Marys residents insist.

Adel Kamel and neighbours want eight trees lined 160 metres along Carinya Street to be cut down and replaced with trees more suitable to the residential area.

They complained about falling leaves clogging up their gutters and smothering front yards and claimed the narrow road has started to crack because of damaged roots.

"There's a lot of elderly and disabled residents living around here," Mr Kamel said.

"It's not just one or two residents complaining. It's the whole street. I have to clean my yard every day and have arguments with my kids to clean up the leaves.

"The piles are one metre high. It's all year round. It's got to the stage where I'm thinking about selling my home."

He said the trees were planted with little planning or thinking.

"The trees are too big to be here; they're better off in a park or reserve," Mr Kamel said.

"They're not native to Australia either. The trees are still growing so the problem will get bigger"

A council spokesman said a tree was removed two years ago due to poor health.

"There is no need to remove the trees as they are in good health, enhance the appearance of the street, provide a buffer to the rail corridor and provide many positive environmental outcomes," he said.

"Leaf drop in itself is rarely reason enough to remove trees. The trees are deciduous and drop their leaves annually. During this period, the council increases the frequency of street sweeping to weekly. Council engineers have recently inspected the road surface and kerb, advising that there is no need to remove the trees as they are not impacting on the road surface."

Residents were unhappy to hear the council defending the trees.

"They should respect and appreciate people's wishes instead of making excuses for the trees," Mr Kamel said.

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