Mamre ready for its first HSC year

Open plan: Mamre Anglican School year 10 students Joshua Baker, Sierra Hadfield, Jesleen Kumar and Adam Tompkin at the site of the senior studies centre. Picture: Gary Warrick

Open plan: Mamre Anglican School year 10 students Joshua Baker, Sierra Hadfield, Jesleen Kumar and Adam Tompkin at the site of the senior studies centre. Picture: Gary Warrick

Mamre Anglican School will see its first cohort of HSC students graduate in 2016, with a new senior studies centre to be built for the purpose.

The first sod was turned on the 720-square-metre development site on Tuesday.

The centre will have science labs, open-plan learning areas, seminar rooms and a student kitchen, built with the help of a $750,000 grant from the Association of Independent Schools.

Headmaster Vic Branson said the former Mamre Christian College had grown from 160 pre-kindergarten to year 10 students to about 500 since it was bought by the Sydney Anglican Schools Corporation in 2008.

The Erskine Park school draws students from the St Marys area and as far afield as Glenwood, Baulkham Hills and South Wentworthville.

"Most parents want their children to stay at the same school if they can from kindergarten to year 12 and this gives them the opportunity to do that," Mr Branson said.

"That partly explains our growth because people are now seeing the school is stable with good resources and teachers.

"We have a record kindergarten enrolment for next year of at least 50, possibly 60. In the whole history of the school they've never had that many."

Mr Branson said two English and mathematics courses, chemistry, drama, technical and applied studies, biology, ancient history, PDHPE, and visual arts would be among the subjects offered for years 11 and 12.

‘‘In addition to that we’re able to offer up to 15 courses of distance education which we have done before successfully for years 9 and 10,’’ he said.

‘‘A lot of our classes will have three [to] five students, so they’ll get very personal attention.

‘‘It will be almost like private tutoring for them.’’

Year 10 student Sierra Hadfield said it was exciting that the 27 students in her grade would be the first to use the space.

‘‘At the end of last year the architect came and talked to our year group about what ideas we might have for the building, which was pretty cool because we got some input into its design,’’ she said.

‘‘A lot of the little things that we wanted were able to be included, though not everything — a pool on the roof was never going to happen.

‘‘We have a big study centre in the middle and lots of little hideaway seats where we can sit and read or study.’’

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